Workaround for WMI client over IPv6

Some years ago, I wrote some examples for the WMI client on Linux. I still get a lot of queries from people trying to use the WMI client to access Windows hosts and I am often happy to help if there are any problems.

One of the latest problems occurred when trying to access a Windows host over IPv6:

$ wmic -U 'user%password' //FD00:180::0:0:0:0:0 "Select Caption From Win32_OperatingSystem"
[..]
UNKNOWN - The WMI query had problems. The error text from wmic is: [librpc/rpc/dcerpc_util.c:343:dcerpc_parse_binding()] Unknown dcerpc transport 'FD00'
[librpc/rpc/dcerpc_connect.c:337:dcerpc_pipe_connect_ncacn_ip_tcp_recv()] failed NT status (c0000017) in dcerpc_pipe_connect_ncacn_ip_tcp_recv
[librpc/rpc/dcerpc_connect.c:828:dcerpc_pipe_connect_b_recv()] failed NT status (c0000017) in dcerpc_pipe_connect_b_recv
[wmi/wmic.c:196:main()] ERROR: Login to remote object.
NTSTATUS: NT_STATUS_NO_MEMORY - Memory allocation error

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Java Service Wrapper 3.5.29 for Windows x64

After returning from my vacation, I was asked to provide the latest version of the Tanuki Service Wrapper. Unfortunately, I only have a Windows Server 2003 R2 and a Visual Studio 2008 license. This means I cannot provide newer Java Service Wrappers than 3.5.29, because Tanuki added new features only available with Windows Server 2008 SDK and beyond.

Update: Due to a generous donation of a VS2008 license, I will be able to provide newer versions. Thank you very much!

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Oracle Linux 7: oracle-rdbms-server-12cR1-preinstall

So today I tried to install the Oracle Preinstall RPM on a freshly installed Oracle Linux 7 machine. However, when I executed yum search rdbms the preinstall package was nowhere to be seen!

It turns out that we need to enable the Oracle Linux 7 “addons” repository in order to find the package. Swiss blogger Martin Berger put me on the right track.

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iptables ACCEPT [0:0] brackets

So lately I have been working a lot more with Linux networking. Consider an iptables configuration like this:

*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [7752:8249066]
[..]
-A RH-Firewall-1-FORWARD -p icmp -m icmp --icmp-type any -j ACCEPT 
-A RH-Firewall-1-FORWARD -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT 
-A RH-Firewall-1-FORWARD -p tcp -m state --state NEW -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT 
[..]
-A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -j REJECT --reject-with icmp-host-prohibited 
COMMIT
# Completed on Fri Nov 21 15:44:47 2014

Ever noticed the brackets right next to the chain? What are those? What do the numbers mean?

*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [0:0]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [7752:8249066]

The answer is pretty easy and pretty obvious in hindsight. These numbers report

  • packet counter for the chain
  • byte counter for the chain

So in our example above, the OUTPUT chain matched 7752 packets and 8249066 bytes.