Import Apple Health data in Garmin Connect

My newest toy is a Garmin Fenix 5 Plus, a very nice smartwatch. In the past, I recorded my steps and other activity data using the Apple Health app on my iPhone. This means that I had a few years worth of activity data that I wanted to move from my Apple Health app to Garmin Connect.

However, that turned out to be not that straight-forward. Garmin only allows you to import GPX, FIT or Fitbit CSV files, not any Apple Health data.

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Do containers contain?

At their core, containers are just Linux processes that are namespaced. This means in practice, many containers still run as processes on the same host machine. While namespacing processes using cgroups creates very good boundaries between processes, the isolation is still not perfect.

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Java Service Wrapper 3.5.37 for Windows x64

A user of the Tanuki Service Wrapper reminded me that Tanuki released version 3.5.37 of the Java Service Wrapper some time ago. So in this post, I can provide version 3.5.37 of the Java Service Wrapper for Windows x64.

As always, I don’t guarantee anything, so please note:

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gopass: “gpg: decryption failed: No secret key”

For a few years now I have been using the pass password manager. It is a wonderfully simple way to manage passwords using PGP to encrypt passwords in text files. The same files can then be placed in a git repository, which makes replicating passwords easy.

For different reasons I am now migrating to gopass, a Go implementation of pass with a few additional features. I am using Homebrew to install gopass on my machine: brew install gopass. Theoretically, gopass should work out-of-the-box and is compatible with the old pass utility. So I was quite surprised to see an error message like this:

$ gopass github
Entry 'github' not found. Starting search...
Found exact match in 'github.com/simonkrenger'
gpg: decryption failed: No secret key

Error: failed to retrieve secret 'github.com/simonkrenger': Failed to decrypt

Strange. But decrypting the password file directly using PGP works fine:

$ gpg -d ~/.password-store/github.com/simonkrenger.gpg
[..]

If the above command using gpg does not work, check your keys using gpg --list-keys and gpg --list-secret-keys. Especially when migrating to GPG2, sometimes keys do not get imported into the new keyrings. In case you need to import the old keyring into the new format like so:

$ gpg --import ~/.gnupg/pubring.gpg
$ gpg --import ~/.gnupg/secring.gpg

But even after importing the keys, I still received gpg: decryption failed: No secret key. So after searching around I found that I need to set the GPG_TTY variable:

$ export GPG_TTY=$(tty)

It seems that not setting the GPG_TTY environment variable leads to the error above. Which is quite misleading. After setting this environment variable (and adding it to the .bash_profile), gopass works as expected.

Linux Magic Reboot

If you have worked with remote Linux servers before, I am guessing you already encountered machines that just don’t want to reboot. This is typically due screwed-up network mounts or stuck processes, so the server will hang during shutdown. But it turns out that there are other ways to reboot a server.

One of these is the “Magic SysRq key“. To reboot a server using the SysRq trigger in the kernel, use the following two commands. First, enable the trigger:

echo 1 > /proc/sys/kernel/sysrq

Then, reboot the server the magic way by typing

echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger

Note that this will reboot the server without unmounting or syncing the filesystems! There are also other options available via the SysRq trigger, some of them are listed in the Wikipedia article above.